USA

Three generals warn of a CIVIL WAR if 2024 election is falsely contested


Three retired US generals warned Friday that America’s divided military could fuel a new civil war if there’s another coup attempt after the 2024 election because ‘more than 1 in 10 of those charged in January 6 attacks had a service record’. 

Former Army Major Gen Paul Eaton, former Brigadier Gen Steven Anderson and former Army Major Gen Antonio Taguba made the worrisome claim in a column for The Washington Post.

‘As we approach the first anniversary of the deadly insurrection at the US Capitol, we – all of us former senior military officials – are increasingly concerned about the aftermath of the 2024 presidential election and the potential for lethal chaos inside our military, which would put all Americans at severe risk,’ the generals penned.

‘We are chilled to our bones at the thought of a coup succeeding next time,’ they added. 

The generals referenced January 6, 2020, when thousands of fiery patriots and Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building, which resulted in the death of five people

Most recently Robert Palmer (pictured), 54, was sentenced to 63 months for his involvement in the January 6 riot, where he assaulted police officers with a fire extinguisher and hurled wooden boards at them

Most recently Robert Palmer (pictured), 54, was sentenced to 63 months for his involvement in the January 6 riot, where he assaulted police officers with a fire extinguisher and hurled wooden boards at them 

In such a polarized political atmosphere, ‘with loyalties split,’ the generals observed that ‘some might follow orders from the rightful commander in chief, while others might follow the Trumpian loser’.

‘In this context, with our military hobbled and divided, US security would be crippled. Any one of our enemies could take advantage by launching an all-out assault on our assets or our allies,’ the column read.

They emphasized: ‘The military and lawmakers have been gifted hindsight to prevent another insurrection from happening in 2024 – but they will succeed only if they take decisive action now’. 

Eaton, Anderson and Taguba said that the events that unfolded on January 6, 2020 – when thousands of fiery patriots and Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building and resulted in the death of five people – showed that ‘the signs of potential turmoil in our armed forces are there’.  

Since, at least 185 people in attendance have since been charged with assaulting or impeding police in a failed bid to stop Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s presidential election victory. 

The three generals were sure to note that ‘more than 1 in 10 of those charged in the attacks had a service record’. 

Most recently, Robert Palmer, 54, from Largo, Florida, was sentenced to 63 months in jail – the harshest sentence yet – for his involvement in the riot, where he assaulted police officers with a fire extinguisher and hurled wooden boards at them.   

The insurrection was a reaction to what ex-President Trump claimed was a fraudulent election, and the former generals seemed angered that the Republican leader has yet to be ‘held to account’.

But he’s not the only one who maintains that the election was an honest one. 

In May a group of 124 retired admirals and generals – the ‘Flag Officers 4 America – published an open letter than questioned the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election.

The letter read: ‘Without fair and honest elections that accurately reflect the “will of the people” our Constitutional Republic is lost. Election integrity demands insuring there is one legal vote cast and counted per citizen. 

‘Legal votes are identified by State Legislature’s approved controls using government IDs, verified signatures, etc. Today, many are calling such commonsense controls “racist” in an attempt to avoid having fair and honest elections. Using racial terms to suppress proof of eligibility is itself a tyrannical intimidation tactic.’ 

Trump’s Defense Secretary Chris Miller later testified that as his boss clung to power in the White House, he was deliberately withholding military protection of the Capitol building before January 6. 

‘It is evident that the whole of our military was caught off-guard,’ Eaton, Anderson and Taguba wrote.

But Miller said five months after the attack that he had three goals during the final days of the Trump administration: Avoiding a major war, avoiding a military coup, and avoiding sending troops to do battle with citizens on American streets.

Eaton, Anderson and Taguba said the event showed that 'the signs of potential turmoil in our armed forces are there,' and were sure to note that 'more than 1 in 10 of those charged in the attacks had a service record'

Eaton, Anderson and Taguba said the event showed that ‘the signs of potential turmoil in our armed forces are there,’ and were sure to note that ‘more than 1 in 10 of those charged in the attacks had a service record’ 

'The military and lawmakers have been gifted hindsight to prevent another insurrection from happening in 2024 - but they will succeed only if they take decisive action now,' the generals said (pictured: Army Major Gen Paul Eaton)

‘The military and lawmakers have been gifted hindsight to prevent another insurrection from happening in 2024 – but they will succeed only if they take decisive action now,’ the generals said (pictured: Army Major Gen Paul Eaton)

A report revealed how in the weeks after Trump’s election defeat, while he refused to accept the outcome at the polls, he tried to use loyalists to push through a withdrawal troops from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, Germany and Africa.   

It was revealed that Trump’s plan to withdraw troops completely from Afghanistan before leaving office was opposed by Miller and other senior officials who succeeded in persuading the president to keep to a plan that would decrease the number of troops to 2,500. 

It was apparently part of what Miller, a US Army veteran who was only installed after Trump’s election defeat, saw as his duty. 

Eaton, Anderson and Taguba also mentioned the Oklahoma National Guard’s new commander Army Brigadier General Thomas Mancino, who refused to enforce the US defense department’s Covid-19 vaccine mandate after a change in commanding officers.

Mancino said that he would listen to the state’s governor Republican Kevin Stitt for orders, who he also said is his commander in chief – not President Biden – since the Oklahoma Guard is not federally mobilized. 

In the opinion column Eaton, Anderson and Taguba called Mancino’s refusal to enforce the vaccine mandate ‘worrying’.

They also claimed the decision increases ‘the potential for a total breakdown of the chain of command along partisan lines – from the top of the chain to squad level… should another insurrection occur’. 

Ray Dalio (pictured), who has a net worth of $20.3 billion, predicted that there is a 30 percent chance of US Civil War in the next decade

Ray Dalio (pictured), who has a net worth of $20.3 billion, predicted that there is a 30 percent chance of US Civil War in the next decade

Meanwhile billionaire Ray Dalio predicts there is a 30 percent chance of US Civil War in the next ten years because of ’emotional’ political polarization,’ but said the Constitution will probably save the nation. 

Dalio is the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund firm, Bridgewater Associates. This year he was ranked as the 88th richest person in the world with a net worth of $20.3 billion. 

He made his bold claims in his new book, ‘Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order: Why Nations Succeed and Fail,’ which was published on November 30. 

He makes his bold claims in his new book, 'Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order: Why Nations Succeed and Fail,' which was published on November 30

He makes his bold claims in his new book, ‘Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order: Why Nations Succeed and Fail,’ which was published on November 30

Dalio explained that he believes there is a ‘dangerously high risk’ that the country will have a civil war within in the next ten years and pointed to the rules of governance being ‘ignored’ and the ‘exceptional amount of polarization’ currently seen in the country. 

‘For example, when close elections are adjudicated and the losers respect the decisions, it is clear that the order is respected,’ he wrote, seemingly referencing the Capitol riot.

‘When power is fought over and grabbed, that clearly signals the significant risk of a revolutionary change with all its attendant disorder.’

He noted that people, including high-ranking officials, have openly doubted the validity of recent elections and expressed their willingness to fight for their beliefs. 

Dalio cites several studies as statistical proof of his claims of polarization within the country showing the deep divide specifically between the two political parties.

A 2019 Pew survey found that 55 per cent of Republicans and 47 percent of Democrats viewed the other as more immoral than other Americans, and 61 percent of Republicans and 54 percent of Democrats said that those of the other party don’t share their values.

Also, 79 percent of Democrats and 83 percent of Republicans said they had ‘cold’ or ‘very cold’ feelings for members of the other party; 57 percent of Democrats and 60 percent of Republicans selected ‘very cold’. 

January 6 coup sentences

  • Leonard Gruppo, Texas: Sentenced on 10/29 to 24 months probation with 90 days of home detention; $500 restitution and a $3,000 fine.
  • Jonathan Ace Sanders Sr, Indiana: Sentenced on 11/4 to 36 months probation, $500 restitution, and 60 hours of community service within six months.  
  • John Wilkerson IV, Maryland: Sentencing held 11/16/2021. Sentenced to 36 months probation; $2,500 fine; $500 restitution and 60 hours of community service.
  • Brittiany Angelina Dillon, Maryland: Sentenced 11/4 to three years probation with two months of home detention; $500 restitution.
  • Caleb Jones, 24, Ohio: Sentenced 12/1 to 24 months probation including two months home confinement, and $500 restitution.
  • Matthew Loganbill, 55, Missouri: Sentenced 10/1/2021 to two years probation, including the first three months in home confinement; $10 special assessment; $500 restitution and 80 hours of community service.
  • Erik Rau, Ohio : Sentenced on 9/29/2021 to 45 days incarceration and $500 restitution.
  •  Frank Scavo, 59, Pennsylvania: Sentenced on 11/22 to 60 days in prison, $5,000 fine and $500 restitution.
  • Jordan Kenneth Stotts, 31, Minnesota: Sentenced 11/9 to 24 months probation with conditions and 60 days home detention; $500 restitution; and 60 hours of community service.
  • Boyd Allen Camper, 54, Montana: Sentenced 11/12 to 60 days incarceration and $10 special assessment.
  • Kevin Cordon. 33, California: Sentenced 11/15/2021 to 12 months probation and $500 restitution. $25 special assessment and $4,000 fine imposed.
  • Joshua Bustle, 34, Virginia: Sentenced in August 2021 to 24 months probation, a special assessment of $10 and $500 restitution.
  • Danielle Nicole Doyle, Oklahoma: Sentenced 10/1/2021 to two months probation, $10 special assessment; $3,000 fine and $500 restitution.
  • Anna Morgan-Lloyd, 49, Indiana: Sentenced to 36 months of probation followed by $500 in restitution.
  • Dona Sue Bissey, 52, Indiana: Sentenced 10/12/2021 to 14 days incarceration, 60 hours community service and $500 restitution.
  • Derek Jancart, 39, Ohio: Sentenced 9/29/2021 to 45 days incarceration and $500 restitution.
  • Thomas Vinson, Kentucky: Sentenced on 10/22 to five years probation, a $5,000 fine, $500 restitution and 120 hours of community service.
  • Robert Maurice Reeder, Maryland: Sentenced 10/12/2021 to 12 months probation, $500 restitution and 100 hours of community service.
  • Lori Ann Vinson, Kentucky: Sentenced on 10/22 to five years probation, a $5000 fine, $500 restitution and 120 hours of community service.
  • Paul Allard Hodgkins, Florida: Sentenced 7/19 to 8 months incarceration followed by 2 years supervised release.
  • Glenn Wes Lee Croy, Colorado: Sentenced 11/5 to 3 years probation; $500 restitution.
  • Eric Chase Torrens, 28, Tennessee: Sentenced on 10/29 to 36 months probation with 90 days of home confinement; $500 restitution.
  • John Lolos: Sentenced 11/19 to 14 days incarceration and $500 restitution.
  • Scott Fairlamb, 43, New Jersey: Sentenced 11/10 to 41 months incarceration.
  • Andrew Bennett, Maryland:  Sentenced 10/1/21 to two years of probation, the first three months of which are to be served in home confinement; $10 special assessment; $500 restitution to the Architect of the Capitol; 80 hours of community service.
  • Karl Dresch, 40, Michigan: Sentenced August 2021 to time served and $500 restitution.
  • Matthew Mazzocco, 37, Texas: Sentenced 9/12/2021 to 36 months of probation and $500 restitution.
  • Jack J. Griffith, 25, Tennessee: Sentenced on 10/28 to 36 months probation and 90 days of home confinement; $500 restitution.
  • Valerie Ehrke, California: Sentenced 9/17/2021 to three years probation with conditions and $500 restitution.
  • Jenna Ryan, 50, Texas: Sentenced 11/4 to 60 days incarceration, $500 restitution and $1000 fine.
  • Robert Bauer, Kentucky: Sentenced Oct. 13 to 45 days incarceration, 60 hours community service and $500 restitution.
  • Edward Hemenway, Virginia: Sentenced Oct. 13 to 45 days incarceration, 60 hours community service and $500 restitution.
  • Troy Anthony Smocks, 58, Texas: Sentenced on 10/21 to 14 months incarceration and 3 years supervised release.
  •  David C. Mish, Jr, 42, Wisconsin: Sentenced 11/18 to 30 days incarceration and $500 restitution.
  • Eliel Rosa, 53, Texas: Sentenced Oct. 12, 2021 to one year probation, $500 restitution and 100 hours of community service.
  • Jacob Anthony Chansley, 33, Arizona: Sentenced Nov. 17 to 41 months in prison.
  •  Bradley Rukstales, 52, Illinois: Sentenced 11/12 to 30 days incarceration and $500 restitution.
  • Cindy Fitchett, 59, Virginia: Sentenced 11/9 to 36 months probation with one month home detention; $500 restitution; and 60 hours community service.
  • Douglas Sweet, 58, Virginia: Sentenced 11/9 to 36 months probation with one month home detention; $500 restitution; and 60 hours community service.
  • Terry Brown, 69, Pennsylvania: Sentenced 12/1 to 36 months probation with the first month as home detention; $500 restitution and 60 hours community service.
  • Michael Curzio, 35, Florida: Sentenced 7/12 to six months incarceration and $500 in restitution.
  • Thomas Gallagher, 61, New Hampshire: Sentenced 10/13/2021 to 24 months probation, 60 hours community service, $500 restitution and a special assessment of $10.



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