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The long-lost Temple of Hercules Gadetanus from the 9th century BC has been found off the coast of Spain


The long-lost temple of Hercules Gadetanus where the deity was worshiped by the ancient Greeks and Romans, including Julius Caesar, found in the 9th century BC, may have been found off the coast of Spain

  • The Temple of Hercules Gadetanus is described in ancient Greek and Roman records
  • Researchers have been searching for the site for centuries and believe they have located it in the Gulf of Cadiz off the coast of Spain
  • The team used LIDAR and found a structure that fit the dimensions of the island where the temple once stood
  • There are also deviations in the structure that appear to be stone ruins










The ancient Greeks and Romans, including famous dictator Julius Caesar, are said to have traveled to a temple in the Gulf of Cadiz, Spain and prayed for strength from the god Hercules—and archaeologists believe they found the ruins of the legendary shrine.

Known as the Temple of Hercules Gadetanus, it was mentioned in ancient records dating back to the 9th century BC and archaeologists believe the submerged group of structures is the long-lost temple.

Researchers at the University of Seville in southern Spain have found traces of a massive building in the Sancti Petri Canal, a coastal and tidal area in the Gulf of Cádiz between Chiclana de la Frontera and San Fernando using the Light Detection and Range System (LIDAR).

This technology uses a remote sensing method to examine the Earth’s surface by shooting lasers at the ground and measuring the time of the reflected light returning to the receiver.

The team identified a rectangular structure measuring 984 feet long and 492 feet wide, the same measurements as the island where the temple once stood, and which contains deviations that could be ancient ruins.

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The team identified a rectangular structure measuring 984 feet long and 492 feet wide, the same measurements as the island where the temple once stood, and which contains deviations that could be ancient ruins.

It is said that the Temple of Hercules Gadetanus was a pillared temple with an eternal flame, a fire lit on an altar, and kept by the priest day and night.

The facade between the columns depicts twelve works of Hercules carved in bronze.

Hercules completed the twelve acts of penance for the murder of his wife Megara and his five children after Hera, the family goddess and wife of Zeus, drove him crazy.

Offerings could be made inside the entrance pillars and the entire temple was on a high stone base.

It is said that the temple of Hercules Gadetanus was a temple with pillars that had an eternal flame, a fire lit on an altar, and kept by the priest day and night.  The facade between the columns depicts twelve works of Hercules carved in bronze

It is said that the Temple of Hercules Gadetanus was a pillared temple with an eternal flame, a fire lit on an altar, and kept by the priest day and night. The facade between the columns depicts twelve works of Hercules carved in bronze

Hercules completed the twelve acts of penance for the murder of his wife Megara and his five children after he was made mad by Hera, the family goddess and wife of Zeus.  Pictured is Hercules slaying a dragon while taking the three golden apples from the Garden of the Hesperides, one of his twelve works.

Hercules completed the twelve acts of penance for the murder of his wife Megara and his five children after Hera, the family goddess and wife of Zeus, drove him crazy. Pictured is Hercules slaying a dragon while taking the three golden apples from the Garden of the Hesperides, one of his twelve works.

Greek and Latin records also say that this is where Julius Caesar wept bitterly before representing Alexander the Great and where the Carthaginian conqueror Hannibal went to give thanks for the success of his military campaign a century and a half ago, according to the El Pais report.

And now the legendary temple may have been found after centuries of searching.

Using the latest radar and aerial imagery technology, researchers have found traces of a large Roman and Phoenician building in the Spanish city of Sancti Petri near Cadiz, believed to be the precious temple of Hercules.

“The documentary sources we analyzed, and archaeological information along with images obtained with digital models of the site, lead us to believe that this could be the legendary Temple of Hercules,” Milagros Alzaga García, head of the Center for Aquatic Archeology of the Andalusian Institute, said in a statement. .

Using the latest radar and aerial imagery technology, researchers have found traces of a large Roman and Phoenician building in the Spanish city of Sancti Petri near Cadiz, believed to be the precious temple of Hercules.

Using the latest radar and aerial imagery technology, researchers have found traces of a large Roman and Phoenician building in the Spanish city of Sancti Petri near Cadiz, believed to be the precious temple of Hercules.

Besides discovering the possible site of the temple, the team may also have discovered an inland harbor or wharf south of the temple, which was a flood zone until less than two centuries ago.

This was a lively Roman settlement along the coast

Important settlement along the coast with many buildings mainly from the Roman period yet to be identified. Altogether, they cover a large area – larger than the entire excavated area in the Roman city of Baelo Claudia in Tarifa.

Hercules vs. hydra

Greek mythology says that the goddess Hera confused Hercules and made him kill his wife and children.

As soon as he woke up from the temporary state of insanity, he prayed to the gods for help.

As part of his punishment, he had to endure 12 jobs, which are very difficult tasks that are almost impossible to complete.

The second of these feats was fighting the nine-headed serpent, Hydra.

Greek myths say that the goddess Hera confused Hercules and made him kill his wife and children

Greek myths say that the goddess Hera confused Hercules and made him kill his wife and children

With his baton, Hercules attacked several heads of the hydra, but as soon as he smashed one head, the other grew in its place, but with the help of his nephew he managed to defeat the monster.

Every time Hercules hit one of the heads of Hydra, Julas would carry a torch into the beheaded neck tendons.

The flames prevented the growth of alternate heads, and finally, Hercules was better than the monster.

Once the Eight Head Mortal was removed and destroyed, Hercules cut off the Ninth Head Immortal and buried it away from the serpent’s body.

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