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Sex therapist Shirley Zusman has died at the age of 107


Sex therapist Shirley Zusman, who trained under the famous Masters and Johnson team and practiced for more than 50 years, has died at the age of 107.

Her son, Mark Zusman, confirmed her December 4 death to the New York Times this weekend.

Born in New York City, Zusman received her Ph.D. from Columbia University, trained with her husband at the Masters & Johnson Institute, and worked with him as co-director of the Center for Human Sexuality at Long Island Jewish Hillside Medical Center.

Published two books. He was president of the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors, and Therapists; She has written a sexist column for Glamor magazine, and has appeared on countless news and talk shows over the course of her illustrious career.

“Shirley was a pioneer in sex therapy and an excellent role model,” Dr. Ruth Westheimer, who attended a class that Zosman taught and had a prolific career as a sex therapist, told the New York Times.

Sex therapist Shirley Zusman, who trained under the famous Masters and Johnson team and practiced for more than 50 years, has died at the age of 107.

Born in New York City in 1914, Zussman received her undergraduate degree in the 1930s, and received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1969.

Born in New York City in 1914, Zussman received her undergraduate degree in the 1930s, and received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1969.

Zussman Shirley Edith Delugach was born on July 23, 1914, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan to a physician father and a surgical nurse mother.

She grew up in Brooklyn, and in 1930 she began attending Smith College, where she majored in psychology. She would go on to earn her degree from Columbia University’s New York School of Social Work.

Excellence in higher education already made her a pioneer, and she chose a new and especially unique specialty in the field of psychology.

She said, according to Medium: “When I was in college, this wasn’t a time when women cared or even thought in terms of careers. “Their idea was…get a good education, get married, have children, raise them the way they grew up themselves.”

Zosman was also married to Leon Zosman, an obstetrician-gynecologist. The couple had two children, Mark and a daughter, Carol Sun.

In 1966, she was working as a social worker and psychotherapist when she and her husband were invited to give a lecture by William H.

The researchers had just published a book called Human Sexual Response, which will eventually be a huge success.

She and her husband, Leon Zusman, a gynecologist and obstetrician, were co-directors of the Center for Human Sexuality at Long Island Jewish Hillside Medical Center

She and her husband, Leon Zusman, a gynecologist and obstetrician, were co-directors of the Center for Human Sexuality at Long Island Jewish Hillside Medical Center

The lecture struck a chord with Zussman and her husband.

‘They were realizing that not only was sex magical and wonderful, but one almost had to learn how to be a good partner,’ she told Time magazine in 2014.

And I thought, “We can do that! Why don’t we do that?”

Zussman received her Ph.D. in Education from Teachers College at Columbia University in 1969. She wrote her thesis about husbands being in the delivery room when their children were born—something that was very rare at the time.

Then she and her husband trained at the Masters & Johnson Institute.

In the 1970s, they became co-directors of the Center for Human Sexuality at Long Island Jewish Hillside Medical Center, where they treated couples—including women who had not had orgasms and men who did. Impotence or premature ejaculation.

According to Medium, Zussman said women are ignorant of their bodies, and see the vulva as an “undetected area.”

They trained together at The Masters and Johnson Institute under Dr. William Masters and Virginia Johnson (pictured)

They trained together at The Masters and Johnson Institute under Dr. William Masters and Virginia Johnson (pictured)

She would have helped them enjoy sex better with a holistic approach.

“You have to look at your priorities,” she told Time magazine. You decide what is important to make you feel good about yourself and your life. And to help make your partner feel good. To create something that satisfies, satisfies a need we all have to be close to someone.

Sexual pleasure, she added, “is only one part of what men and women want for each other.” They want intimacy. They want rapprochement. They want understanding. They want comfort. They want to have fun. And they want someone who really cares about them other than going to bed with them.

In 1979, she and her husband published a book, ‘Together: A Handbook of Sexual Enrichment for Couples, which examines sex from a physical and psychological point of view.

Zussman was also twice president of the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors, and Therapists; Editing of the newsletter “Sex over forty”; I spent about 15 years writing a monthly “Sex and Health” column for Glamor magazine.

She appears frequently on television as well, and over the years has given interviews to the likes of Oprah Winfrey, Barbara Walters and Phil Donahue, and has also appeared on 20/20, NBC Nightly News, and CBS News.

She and her husband published a book

She has been active late in her life, and in 2017, she published another book called

She and her husband published Together: A Guide to Couples Sexual Enrichment in 1979 (left), and in 2017, also published What Should We Do with Age?: A Collection of Essays (right)

She has been professionally active late in her life, and in 2017, she published another book, What Should We Do with Age?: A Collection of Essays.

Dr. Ruth Westheimer (pictured) described Zussman as

Dr. Ruth Westheimer (pictured) described Zosman as a “pioneer in sex therapy and an excellent role model”

She was even still receiving patients at the age of 105.

In 2014, she considered changing attitudes about sex therapy in her more than five decades of practice.

“I don’t think the stigma around sex therapy is as there as it was in the early years,” she said.

People were ashamed of having to go to a psychologist or social worker, because that meant they needed help. Lots of people resist[ed] The idea that someone needs to tell them how to have sex.

In addition to her two children, Zusman has three grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren. Her husband died in 1980.

Dr. Ruth, who took a course by Zussman and her husband at the Long Island Clinic while working as a program manager at Planned Parenthood, said learning from Zussman was her first experience studying sex.

They were pioneers, because she was a therapist and her husband was a gynecologist and this confirmed the correctness of the work. It gave her the legitimacy that sex therapists like me need. I wouldn’t have talked about orgasms had it not been for Shirley.



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