News

Rachel Riley wins defamation fight: star awarded £10,000 in damages


Rachel Riley has been awarded £10,000 in a High Court defamation battle after a former aide to Jeremy Corbyn was sued for wrongly accusing the former Labor leader of a ‘Nazi’.

TV presenter Ms Riley, 35, ‘entitled’ to ‘justify’ over tweet posted by Laura Murray, 32, more than two years ago, Mr Nicklin’s ruling today.

The spat began after a Brexit supporter smashed an egg on Mr Corbyn’s head during a visit to Finsbury Park Mosque in north London on March 3, 2019.

Ms Riley, the numbers expert on Channel 4’s Countdown Show, initially posted a screenshot of a January 2019 tweet by Guardian columnist Owen Jones about an attack on former BNP leader Nick Griffin, who said: ‘I think life sound advice Hey, if you don’t want eggs to be thrown at you, don’t be a Nazi.

She added a “good tip” with emojis of a red rose and an egg.

Ms Murray later tweeted: ‘Today Jeremy Corbyn went to his local mosque to visit mine, and was attacked by a Brexit supporter. Rachel Riley tweeted that Corbyn deserved to be attacked because he’s a Nazi. This woman is as dangerous as she is stupid. She shouldn’t Nobody has to deal with it. Never.’

Riley, who has become an outspoken critic of Labor’s handling of allegations of anti-Semitism, said she had been sarcastic in her tweet, not calling Corbyn a Nazi, and telling the judge that Ms Murray’s tweet had caused serious damage to her reputation.

Mr Nicklin concluded that Ms. Riley had established that Murray’s tweet had caused serious damage to her reputation. He found that the two women were honest in their evidence and did their best to “help the court”.

“I am extremely pleased to have won my two defamation cases against Laura Murray, the former Labor Chief of Complaints,” Ms Riley said in a tweet on Twitter. This has been a very stressful process and I’m relieved that I finally cleared it.

Laura Murray pictured outside the Supreme Court.  She tweeted in 2019 that Ms Riley was 'dangerous as stupid' over criticism of the former Labor leader.

TV presenter Ms Riley, left, is ‘entitled’ to ‘prove’ due to a tweet posted by Laura Murray, right, over two years ago, Mr Nicklin’s ruling today

Ms Murray was a stakeholder manager in Mr Corbyn's office (both pictured) when he was Labour's leader, and went on to serve as the party's chief complaints officer, before going on to teach.

Ms Murray was a stakeholder manager in Mr Corbyn’s office (both pictured) when he was Labour’s leader, and went on to serve as the party’s chief complaints officer, before going on to teach.

Timeline: Riley’s claim against a former Corbyn aide

January 10, 2019: Former BNP leader Nick Griffin tweeted that he rewatched footage of “100 far-left thugs attacking a BNP MEP press conference” in 2009.

He says Guardian columnist Owen Jones was “encouraging them (from behind)”.

Jones replies, “I think the good life advice is, if you don’t want eggs thrown at you, don’t be a Nazi. It seems fair to me.

March 3rd: An egg is thrown at Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn at Finsbury Park Mosque.

Rachel Riley later posted a screenshot of Owen Jones’ egg tweet, saying it was “good advice,” with a red rose and egg emoji.

On the same day, Laura Murray, then chief aide to the Labor leader, tweeted: “Today, Jeremy Corbyn went to his local mosque to visit mine, and was attacked by a Brexit supporter.

Rachel Riley tweeted that Corbyn deserved to be attacked because he is a Nazi.

This woman is as dangerous as she is dumb. Nobody has to deal with it…ever.

Mrs. Riley begins legal proceedings.

April 24, 2020: Ms Riley won the first round of her defamation lawsuit in the Supreme Court over the tweet.

Judge Nicklin says that “the presumption that a person has publicly endorsed a violent attack on a person is a clear defamation of the common law.”

He adds that it is “behaviour that would significantly influence, in an opposite way, the attitude of others towards the plaintiff or be inclined to do so.”

But he rejects Murray’s lawyer’s claim that she was expressing an opinion when she said Ms Riley said the Labor leader “deserves to be attacked”.

He said it was a “simple factual statement and will be understood as such”.

May 10, 2021: Ms Riley told the Supreme Court she was unable to sleep and was bombed after a former aide to Jeremy Corbyn claimed she said she “deserves to be attacked because he is a Nazi”.

December 20 2021: Rachel Riley was awarded £10,000 in compensation after Mr Nicklin ruled that she was ‘eligible’ to be ‘acquitted’.

Murray was a stakeholder manager in Corbyn’s office when he was Labor leader, and she went on to chair the party’s grievances, before turning to teaching.

She argued that what she tweeted was true and honestly reflects her well-established views.

Judge Nicklin, in a previous hearing, ruled Murray’s tweet was defamatory.

He concluded that the tweet meant that Ms. Riley “publicly stated” that Corbyn had been attacked while visiting a mosque; that he “deserves to be violently attacked”; By doing so, she has shown herself to be a “dangerous and stupid person” who “risks inciting unlawful violence”; And that people shouldn’t “deal with it”.

The judge was asked to consider whether serious damage to Mrs. Riley’s reputation had been done, and whether Murray had a defense of truth, honest opinion or the public interest.

Ms Riley, who studied mathematics at Oxford and is on maternity leave from Count Down after giving birth in November, told the judge she was Jewish and had a “hate of anti-Semitism”.

She said she spoke out against anti-Semitism and believed Corbyn’s Labor Party was “promoting anti-Semitism”.

Ms. Murray told the judge that her job included working with the Jewish community “to try to find solutions to the problem of anti-Semitism that had become evident in parts of the Labor Party membership”.

Ms Riley had earlier written in a statement: ‘I have not tweeted that Jeremy Corbyn deserved to be attacked.

I was really offended because I was called “dangerous and stupid” and that people were told to “never” have anything to do with me.

I made a sarcastic but, in my opinion, important comment regarding Owen Jones and a few hours later the defendant was posting on Twitter that I had advocated violence against Jeremy Corbyn because I said in her words he deserved to be attacked because he was a Nazi.

Riley claims Murray was “whistling dogs” to her sympathetic Twitter followers to channel a “heap” of anger and hate.

She previously told the Supreme Court: ‘The allegations in the tweet made me feel that I was being physically assaulted which is of course very disturbing.

The volume of abusive and threatening messages consumed everything.

‘I found it difficult to focus on my work and suffered from sleepless nights. So far, the abuse has gone unchecked and my reputation has gone unpunished.

Murray told the court that Ms Riley was “deliberately provocative” by tweeting “good advice” on the day Jeremy Corbyn was raised.

She denied denigrating Riley, arguing for truth, honest opinion, and responsible publication in her tweet.

Ms Murray told the court that all the tweets she saw read “How can you call Jeremy Corbyn a Nazi?” None of them said, “This is a comment on hypocrisy, this is a tweet on double standards.”

Ms Riley posted a screenshot of a January 2019 tweet by Guardian columnist Owen Jones about an attack on former BNP leader Nick Griffin, which said: 'I think the sound advice for life is, 'If you don't want eggs thrown at you' , Fla

Ms Riley posted a screenshot of a January 2019 tweet by Guardian columnist Owen Jones about an attack on former BNP leader Nick Griffin, which said: ‘I think the sound advice for life is, ‘If you don’t want eggs thrown at you’ No, “You won’t be a Nazi.” She added a “good tip” with emojis of a red rose and an egg. Ms Murray later tweeted: ‘Today Jeremy Corbyn went to his local mosque to visit mine, and was attacked by a Brexit supporter. Rachel Riley tweeted that Corbyn deserved to be attacked because he’s a Nazi. This woman is as dangerous as she is stupid. She shouldn’t Nobody has to deal with it. Never.’

Mr Nicklin ruled that Mrs. Murray's tweet was defamatory under common law.  Pictured: London's High Court - where the case was heard

Mr Nicklin ruled that Mrs. Murray’s tweet was defamatory under common law. Pictured: London’s High Court – where the case was heard

When asked if she saw it as a “heap,” she said: “The way it seemed to me was a deliberate provocation of Jeremy Corbyn being attacked.

Tweet about Nazis being attacked saying “good advice”, “If you don’t want to be zealous don’t be a Nazi.” The way it appeared was deliberately provocative and designed to provoke a reaction from the left.

And there was a reaction, and a lot of people were saying ‘Jeremy Corbyn is not a Nazi, that’s not a fair comparison to make’.

Since many people have been criticizing Rachel Riley in this way, the purpose of my tweet was to advise people, all listening is, “Don’t react to this,” “It’s a waste of time,” “Nobody gets anything from it” “It’s a huge waste of emotional resources.” I could see that this was really the opposite. It is just completely useless.



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button