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PICTURED: Escaped Alabama inmate Casey White is seen in new mugshot


Casey White, the escaped Alabama inmate who went on the run with his prison guard lover for 11 days before being arrested last night, is now back in jail and can be seen for the first time in his new mugshot today. 

White and his lover Vicky White were finally caught up with yesterday, bringing an end to a nationwide manhunt that began on April 29.

Vicky died after being shot in the head during a dramatic police chase last night in Evansville, Indiana. 

Initially, police said she killed herself but now it is being suggested that Casey may have pulled the trigger. 

It has also emerged that the pair had been hiding out in Indiana since May 3 and their vehicle was reported to local police on May 4 by a member of the public who saw it parked at a strange angle. 

James Stinson, who operates a car wash in Evansville, says he called police and suggested that the vehicle might belong to the pair after they dumped it at his business last week. 

Vicky White died of a gunshot wound that was at first thought to have been self-inflicted. Sheriffs now say they wouldn't be surprised if Casey shot her

Casey White is seen in his new mugshot after being taken into custody in Indiana yesterday, bringing an end to an 11 day manhunt 

The pair were caught Monday afternoon after leading US Marshals on a car chase that lasted 'less than a few minutes'. They had been in Evansville, Indiana, since May 3

The pair were caught Monday afternoon after leading US Marshals on a car chase that lasted ‘less than a few minutes’. They had been in Evansville, Indiana, since May 3

The two were found 219 miles away from the jail they left in Alabama on April 29. The manhunt spanned three different states

The two were found 219 miles away from the jail they left in Alabama on April 29. The manhunt spanned three different states

Because it hadn’t been stolen, the authorities said there was nothing they could do. 

Stinson told NewsNation that he towed the vehicle on May 4. 

‘I walked up to the truck and went, ‘Oh my God, it’s probably this guy from Alabama.’ I walked and looked in the truck because I think he could be dead, passed out, who knows? So I backed up. I opened the door, the keys are in it. I start it up. I Googled the local police department’s number because I didn’t want to call 911.

‘They send a cop out. The cop says, ‘Well there ain’t nothing I can do. It’s not reported stolen.’ He ran the plates. Then he left and came back. He looked in it again. He found a gun lock in the seat and said, ‘Oh my God, there’s a gun lock but there ain’t no guns around.’ So he left. He just said, ‘Do what you’ve got to do.’ I towed it.’ 

On Sunday, May 8, police finally contacted Stinson and asked about the truck. That is when he checked surveillance camera footage from his business and found video footage of Casey. 

‘I’m just glad it’s over and nobody got hurt. I was more concerned about one person trying to confront them. It took a team, and I’m glad it ended this way. This guy has nothing to live for; he’s dangerous. Any one of us could’ve said something wrong and he’d have went off. I could’ve got on him for leaving the car in the wash bay, but I chose not to,’ he added.  

Initially, police believed Vicky shot herself in the car after the chase ended in a crash. However Lauderdale County Sheriff Rick Sheriff Singleton said he would not be surprised if Casey was the one who pulled the trigger. He was awaiting trial for the murder of a different woman when Vicky helped him escape on April 29. 

‘He will be in a cell by himself. He will stay in handcuffs and shackles while he’s in that cell and if he wants to sue me for violating his civil rights, so be it. 

‘He’s not getting out of this jail again. I’ll assure you that,’ Singleton said. 

Vicky was driving the pair’s vehicle when it crashed after a police chase. When officers surrounded the car, Casey told them to help his ‘wife’ who had been shot. 

He then insisted that it wasn’t him who pulled the trigger. The pair fled the Lauderdale County Jail then changed vehicles, driving to Tennessee before dumping that car and picking up another. 

It’s unclear what their plan was before they were caught. 

Vicky White, who was driving, was found pinned inside with a gunshot wound to the head, said US Marshal Matt Keely

Vicky White, who was driving, was found pinned inside with a gunshot wound to the head, said US Marshal Matt Keely

The capture comes after Casey White was spotted at a car wash in Evansville, where they abandoned a Ford F-150, on May 3. The owner of the car wash called police on May 4 to report their vehicle but nothing was done until Sunday, he says

The capture comes after Casey White was spotted at a car wash in Evansville, where they abandoned a Ford F-150, on May 3. The owner of the car wash called police on May 4 to report their vehicle but nothing was done until Sunday, he says

‘I noticed the car hanging out of the bay, which was unusual. It kept sitting there … Every time I left and came back, the truck was still there.’ 

He said he notified the authorities last Wednesday but nothing was done. 

‘I walked up to the truck and went, “Oh my God, it’s probably this guy from Alabama.’ I walked and looked in the truck because I think he could be dead, passed out, who knows? So I backed up. I opened the door, the keys are in it. I start it up. I Googled the local police department’s number because I didn’t want to call 911.

‘They send a cop out. The cop says, ‘Well there ain’t nothing I can do. It’s not reported stolen.’ He ran the plates. Then he left and came back. He looked in it again. 

‘He found a gun lock in the seat and said, “Oh my God, there’s a gun lock but there ain’t no guns around.’ So he left. He just said, ‘Do what you’ve got to do.’ I towed it.’  

Vicky had been seen entering and exiting the motel room in a wig. 

She and Casey had been having a secret affair for more than two years. 

In the months leading up to the escape, Vicky sold her home and withdrew $90,000 in cash from her bank account. 

Video posted on Facebook by Joey Medicis shows local Evansville police cruisers speed into a business, followed by police SUVs and pickup trucks with emergency lights.

The footage was filmed moments after Vicky White crashed her gray Cadillac into a ditch.

Casey White is then led away in handcuffs.

‘He went through the gate at work where we’re usually at,’ says a voice behind the camera. ‘They spun him out into the grass.’

Regarding Vicky, another person says, ‘She’s probably dead.’

The jail guard was found in the car with a gunshot wound to the head. She died in the hospital a couple hours later.

Sheriff Singleton now believes that Casey and Vicky were in a ‘romantic relationship’ and that Vicky was ‘just as concerned about coming back and facing her family and her co-workers as she was the charges.’

Vicky was a widow and had no children.

Before she died, Singleton said of his employee, ‘I hope she survives this. She has some answers to give us.’

He continued: ‘You don’t know who you can trust. I had every bit of trust in Vicky White. She has been an exemplary employee. What in the world prompted her to pull off something like this, I don’t know. I don’t know if we’ll ever know.’

Vicky was set to be put in a different facility than the Lauderdale County jail where she worked for 17 years and helped Casey escape . Casey will be sent back to state prison.

On Monday afternoon, Singleton thanked investigators from the various national agencies that helped them capture the pair, along with the media for shedding light on the story.

‘Most escapes – from a county jail especially – they’re not planned. They’re just sort of spontaneous. There are no resources available, no plan in place,’ he said during a press conference Monday evening.

‘This escape was obviously well planned and calculated. A lot of preparation went into this. They had plenty of resources, had cash,’ he said, referring to the money that Vicky had on her from the recent sale of her home. ‘They had everything they needed to pull this off.

‘We were starting from ground zero, and not only that, we started – they got a six-hour head start on us.’

Singleton added: ‘We got a dangerous man off the streets today. He’s never gonna see the light of day again. That’s a good thing.’

‘I’ll probably hear from a civil rights attorney but I don’t care,’ Singleton said.



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