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People from all over the world share their biggest culture shock after moving to the UK


An Italian woman has revealed her biggest culture shocks after moving to the UK for six months.

Posting on the Q&A site, 21-year-old Chiara Bay, from Italy, revealed the elements of British culture that totally blew her away during her six-month stay in London.

From selling Curry’s electronics rather than closing down food and Indian bars at 11pm, Kiara admitted she’s totally baffled by British culture.

She wrote: “Overall, it was a great experience but there were many traumatic moments of culture shock that left me intrigued and confused.”

Chiara Bay, 21, from Italy, revealed the elements of British culture that totally amazed her after living in the country

From selling Curry's electronics rather than closing food and pubs at 11pm, Chiara admitted she's totally baffled by British culture

From selling Curry’s electronics rather than closing food and pubs at 11pm, Chiara admitted she’s totally baffled by British culture

Chiara shared her thoughts on the more exotic elements of British culture, explaining: “Pub culture.

I was shocked to learn how much the English enjoy visiting a pub and having a drink because their stereotype is that of a sullen, polite Englishman.

“There are so many pubs, restaurants, nightclubs and pubs all over London and people really like a pint or a Pimm punch.”

She continued, “As much as Londoners love to drink, the last call in the pub is 11:00 pm in Italy, 11:00 pm when people start getting ready to go out.”

The Italian revealed that she had lived in the UK for six months, and said there were various elements of culture that left her shocked

The Italian revealed that she had lived in the UK for six months, and said there were various elements of culture that left her shocked

Meanwhile, she also revealed how amazed she was at how the British crossed the street, saying: “Because they drive on the left in London, the traffic wasn’t coming from the direction I expected. Lots of nearby calls every day!

Kiara said she found it confusing that “pants” means “underwear” and “pants” means “pants.”

She continued, “When someone says something ‘good shout’ they mean ‘good idea’.”

The store called ‘Currys’ doesn’t sell curry. They sell electronics.

Among the things she said that surprised her was how

Among the things she said that surprised her was how the British “crossed the street”, admitting she had “many phone calls nearby”

Don’t google “curry” after spending a night at the pub and then walking into the curry thinking you’ll be able to order curry because you’ll be very frustrated.

She added: “As a greeting, everyone in the UK is saying, ‘Are you okay? When they say this, they simply mean “hello.”

But every time I heard it, I thought I was sad or upset. (Very reasonable considering my face resting with a ****).

The word “terrible” means “really” and the world “terribly” also means “really.” I’m so glad we got out on this date. The night went very well. I really like you.’

Kiara, who wrote on Quora, said she felt

Writing on Quora, Kiara said she felt “overwhelming culture shock” and described elements of British society as “intriguing” and “confusing”.

And she continued, ‘Instead of ‘sleeping in’ the Brits, lay down. This doesn’t seem like a big deal but it’s confusing in conversation.

Meanwhile, others on the site quickly responded to the same question, with one person, Hania Bela, from Malaysia, detailing how they became confused about many elements of British culture after moving to the country to pursue higher education.

She wrote: “This is almost surprising, in the UK there are many working buildings that are over 300 years old. For example, what puzzled me is that Cambridge is older than the Majapahit Empire (an ancient empire in Indonesia before the Europeans came).

In the meantime, she added, “Cows are around Cambridge, this is specific to Cambridge as a city. When I just arrived, I was very shocked to see..cows..in the middle of the city..behind King’s College.”

Other social media users were also quick to share the moments that left them confused

Other social media users were also quick to share the moments that left them confused

Meanwhile, another user, Shamim Chowdhury, admitted that he also suffered from culture shocks when he was living in the UK.

He explained: ‘Something very important, when crossing the road – look right or die.

“We drive on the left, so when crossing the road, look to the right first and not just instinctively look to the left as you have done all your life.”

He continued: ‘Keep the doors open for others – you keep them for the person behind you, take charge of the person behind them, etc., and do it a little longer for the elderly or those with prams, etc. Thank you Here. very.’

Meanwhile, Peter Brenna Ryan said he moved to the UK in 2009, explaining: “The big culture shock was the abundance of so-called chavs.

They are everywhere, especially in the north. These are British young men, usually of the lower class, who wear tracksuits, and who are having children in their teens.

They are also easily agitated. I’ve seen these at Little Britain, but I never expected them to be so prevalent.



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