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National Trust reveals slave trade links to the battlefield where Bonnie Prince Charlie was defeated


National Trust reveals slave trade links to the battlefield where Bonnie Prince Charlie was defeated

  • The location of the Culloden was added when Charles Edward Stuart sailed aboard a French slave ship
  • Battlefield is the first in Britain to be linked to the slave trade by an official organization
  • A National Trust for Scotland report linked a third of NTS sites to the slave trade










Heritage experts have declared the battlefield where Bonnie Prince Charlie was defeated and the Jacobite Rebellion crushed in 1746, linked to the slave trade.

Added the location of Culloden – where the Duke of Cumberland suppressed the rebellion of the “alleged young man” Charles Edward Stuart – as Charles sailed from Nantes on a French slave ship owned by plantation owner Antoine Walsh.

The battlefield, near Inverness, is the first in Britain to be linked to the slave trade by an official organization.

The Scottish National League report said that in the aftermath of the battle, descendants of defeated Scots and prisoners of war were taken to British colonies where they later owned slaves, worked “enslaved crews” and ran farms.

Heritage experts have declared the battlefield on which Bonnie defeated Prince Charlie and crushed the Jacobite Rebellion of 1746, linked to the slave trade.

Added Culloden location - where the Duke of Cumberland quelled a rebellion

The site of Culloden – where the Duke of Cumberland suppressed the rebellion of “young pretender” Charles Edward Stuart – was added to the list when Charles sailed from Nantes on a French slave ship owned by plantation owner Antoine Walsh

The report, which follows the Black Lives Matter protests in 2020, linked more than a third of NTS sites directly or indirectly to the slave trade or its abolition.

Other sites, such as the birthplace of Peter Pan author J.M. Barrie, have a broader association with a slavery-driven economy.

His family’s weaving house was added at Kirriemuir because the industry was producing clothing for slaves.

Scottish historian Sir Tom Devin told The Daily Telegraph that ‘every nook and cranny’ in Scottish life was influenced by the slave trade at some point and so ‘by the comic logic of the NTS, every person observing at that period, whether slave traders or not, It’s fair game.”

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