News

A Lego-loving Cambridge couple display a 21-foot replica of the Old London Bridge in their living room


Two Lego enthusiasts have now completed a 21-foot replica of the old London Bridge after working on it for four weeks, sometimes spending 14 hours a day.

The stunning creations, their 27th project, are proudly located in the living room of Mike Addis, 63, and Katherine Whitman, 58, of Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire.

A replica of the bridge, which crossed the Thames from 1209 to 1831, was made using 400,000 Lego blocks and is three feet high.

Mike Addis, 63, and Catherine Whitman, 58, pictured, proudly display their latest project, a 21-foot-tall replica of the Old London Bridge

The coupe version of the bridge was made using 400,000 LEGO bricks and is three feet high in the middle of their living room

The coupe version of the bridge was made using 400,000 LEGO bricks and is three feet high in the middle of their living room

Mr. Addis and Mrs. Whitman’s renovation of the bridge includes 78 homes, 500 small figures, a castle and a chapel.

Features also include guards who patrol the bridge fee, bakers, and residents.

However, it only includes three-fourths of the entire length of the bridge, because the full volume would not fit into the house.

The Old London Bridge replica has a number of figures with the structure including a castle and a chapel

The Old London Bridge replica has a number of figures with the structure including a castle and a chapel

There are a few figures of guards patrolling the bridge fees as well as other figures of bakers, merchants and residents

There are a few figures of guards patrolling the bridge fees as well as other figures of bakers, merchants and residents

Frost Fair celebrations reimagined with Lego.  The replica comes with 78 houses and 500 minifigures

Frost Fair celebrations reimagined with Lego. The replica comes with 78 houses and 500 minifigures

The model is inspired by Frost Fairs, erected when the Thames froze from the 16th century.

Mr Addis, the economics teacher, said: “It is likely that this model is not practical for us because it is located in the middle of the room.

It divides the room in two – there is a foot gap at one end to go around the other side of the living room.

We had a party recently with people on one side of the bridge and some on the other.

The festive replica is inspired by the Frost Fairs held when the Thames froze from the 16th century

The festive replica is inspired by the Frost Fairs held when the Thames froze from the 16th century

“Most people are in awe because it’s so big.”

Mr. Addis now plans to fit himself, and Mrs. Whitman and 12 family members – including young children – round the carefully designed model for Christmas.

He added: ‘We have sofas on one side and fireplaces on the other.

“We have separate LEGO pieces for the kids to play with.”

In search of a replica, the couple visited an existing wooden model of the bridge in St Magnus’ Church and Martyr’s Church, London.

The Lego figure crosses the bridge in the replica.  The model only includes three-quarters of the entire length of the bridge, as the full size will not fit into the house

The Lego figure crosses the bridge in the replica. The model only includes three-quarters of the entire length of the bridge, as the full size will not fit into the house

Unlike the current London Bridge that crosses the river, the Old London Bridge was known to be a bustling center for merchants to set up shop.

Shops and homes lined the busy crossing, and in the 1580s water mills were installed by Queen Elizabeth.

Mr Addis said: “Everything is made individually, every home is completely different.

Mr. Addis and Mrs. Whitman, pictured, worked on the project for four weeks, sometimes spending 14 hours a day

Mr. Addis and Mrs. Whitman, pictured, worked on the project for four weeks, sometimes spending 14 hours a day

Some days we worked 14 hours to get it done.

‘You have to be patient. Some of them are very difficult. To make the curved arches, we had to build them with half a brick.

The form will remain until January 6, when it is conventionally removed.

Couples who love Lego since childhood but are invigorated when a friend visits the family with their child and brings Lego out of the attic for him to play with.

Old London Bridge, on file.  Shops and homes lined the busy crossing, and in the 1580s water mills were installed by Queen Elizabeth

Old London Bridge, on file. Shops and homes lined the busy crossing, and in the 1580s water mills were installed by Queen Elizabeth

One of the couple's previous LEGO Christmas creations.  Pictured is a model of Ely Cathedral in Cambridgeshire

One of the couple’s previous LEGO Christmas creations. Pictured is a model of Ely Cathedral in Cambridgeshire

Mr. Addis added: ‘We realized how much we love Lego. We do it with friends sometimes – a friend came over at the weekend to help us.’

The couple previously built a huge polar bear and a model for Ely Cathedral.

They recycle the bricks each time, carefully placing them into color and size categories when you break them down.

What was the frost?

The Frost Fairs on the River Thames occurred when the water froze, and it can remain iced for up to two months in a tradition believed to have begun in the 17th century.

Londoners sometimes used this as a festive opportunity to enjoy the often harsh winter with shops selling fruit and grilled meats, pubs, ice skating rinks and even football pitches.

By January the snow was so thick that some shopkeepers were able to set fire to their tents to keep warm.

Frost fairs on the Thames occurred when the water froze in a tradition believed to have begun in the 17th century

Frost fairs on the Thames occurred when the water froze in a tradition believed to have begun in the 17th century

Between 1607 and 1814, there were seven major fairs and it is believed that there were several of them.

The climate began to get too warm for fairs to continue by the 19th century, but the frozen river saw a number of festivities come and go.

Some records indicate that it was one year until there was an elephant roaming.

Source: Historic UK



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button