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Previously unseen 2004 portrait of Queen Elizabeth is unveiled to mark her Platinum Jubilee


It’s the unseen Queen: Her Majesty is shown smiling quizzically in newly-released portrait to mark Platinum Jubilee… 19 years after it was taken

Her Majesty is amused – smiling quizzically in a new portrait unveiled to mark her Platinum Jubilee. 

As the Duchess of Cambridge met fashion industry stars and models at a British design event yesterday, the monarch’s own modelling experience went on display with the release of the test shot taken in 2004. 

The photograph, which seems almost to catch her off-guard, was taken by Rob Munday nearly 19 years ago during a photoshoot to create the first officially commissioned 3D hologram of the Queen.

This particular image, entitled Platinum Queen: Felicity, went unnoticed in Mr Munday’s archives until he rediscovered it last summer. 

It shows the Queen reacting to a mischievous aside from her confidante and senior dresser Angela Kelly as the pair prepared for the shoot at Buckingham Palace. 

The photograph, which seems almost to catch her off-guard, was taken by Rob Munday nearly 19 years ago during a photoshoot to create the first officially commissioned 3D hologram of the Queen

A portrait shows a young Queen Elizabeth II during her coronation in June 1953

A portrait shows a young Queen Elizabeth II during her coronation in June 1953

Mr Munday said: ‘The Queen’s daily life is so full of responsibility and duty that it was wonderful to see this fleeting moment of relaxation and pleasure.

‘It is an uplifting portrait, so different from many of the more sombre portraits commissioned in recent years and a befitting celebration for her Platinum Jubilee.’

The portrait was described as capturing ‘the twinkle in the Queen’s eye’ and ‘the deep bond and trust’ between the monarch and Miss Kelly, with the piece dedicated to their 20 years of friendship.

The original holographic portrait titled Equanimity, by artist Chris Levine and holographer Mr Munday, was voted the visitors’ favourite at London’s National Portrait Gallery. 

Meanwhile the Duchess of Cambridge celebrated another feat of artistry as she presented the Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design to up and coming designer Saul Nash. 

Wearing a £785 green dress by London-based designer Edeline Lee, Kate towered over many models as she met Edward Enninful, editor-in-chief of British Vogue, at the event at the Design Museum, a stone’s throw from Kensington Palace

Wearing a £785 green dress by London-based designer Edeline Lee, Kate towered over many models as she met Edward Enninful, editor-in-chief of British Vogue, at the event at the Design Museum, a stone’s throw from Kensington Palace 

Now in its fifth year, the award recognises the role that the design and fashion industry has played throughout the Queen’s reign

Now in its fifth year, the award recognises the role that the design and fashion industry has played throughout the Queen’s reign 

Wearing a £785 green dress by London-based designer Edeline Lee, Kate towered over many models as she met Edward Enninful, editor-in-chief of British Vogue, at the event at the Design Museum, a stone’s throw from Kensington Palace.

Now in its fifth year, the award recognises the role that the design and fashion industry has played throughout the Queen’s reign. 

Asked about report in The Mail on Sunday last week that the Duchess of Cornwall is about to become Vogue’s latest royal cover girl, Mr Enninful laughed: ‘My phone’s been ringing but I just can’t say anything. You know I can’t comment!’ 

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