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Nonprofit chaired by BLM co-founder pulled in $4.2m donations from Silicon Valley foundation


A ‘dark money’ nonprofit run by one of Black Lives Matter’s founders received $2.5million in donations from a Silicon Valley foundation in 2020, new tax filings have revealed.

Forms filed last month show that Dignity and Power Now – a Los Angeles-based grassroots agency headed by BLM cofounder Patrisse Cullors – secured $4.2million in donations in 2020, with the bulk of that sum coming from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a multibillion-dollar fund based in the Bay Area. 

The firm, which bills itself as ‘a donor-advised community foundation serving the Silicon Valley region,’ is one of the largest funds in the country, and received $2.1 billion in contributions in 2020 alone, tax records show. 

Moreover, the high-powered fund is linked to some of the biggest names in the Valley, including Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, and Netflix cofounder Reed Hastings, who have all contributed cash to the sizable foundation.

Patrice Cullors dark-money nonprofit has obtained $2.5m in donations from a woke Silicon Valley fund whose benefactors include some of tech’s richest tycoons 

Cullors Dignity & Power Now obtained more than $2.5m from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Cullors Dignity & Power Now obtained more than $2.5m from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation 

There’s no suggestion any of those tech tycoons donated directly to Cullors’ nonprofit, or of learning whose donations made their way into her charity.  

Cullors, 38, who resigned last May from the activist group in the wake of revelations she’d spent millions on a slew of lavish homes using donated funds, has not commented on the contribution, which amounts to $2.5million, records show.

The ‘dark money’ designation used to describe Cullors’ nonprofit – which was reportedly used to buy BLM brass a 6,500-square-foot mansion in 2020 – is used to describe an entity that does not disclose from where it receives funding.

Speaking to Fox News Friday, the outlet to first report the donation, the executive director for Dignity and Power Now asserted that the transaction was not ‘dark’ and that it was available for the public to see.

Mark Zuckerberg

Jack Dorsey

The Silicon Valley Community Fund’s past donors include Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, left, and former Twitter chief Jack Dorsey, right 

‘There is nothing “dark” or non-transparent about money Fox was so easily able to identify the source and documentation for,’ Mark-Anthony Clayton-Johnson told the outlet

‘When we choose to accept philanthropic dollars, it is grounded in the commitment and reality that we move resources directly towards improving the lives of Black and Brown communities whom we serve and are accountable to,’ he continued. ‘Our impact and work speaks for itself and we are proud to continue doing it.’

‘If what you publish contains falsehoods and distortions, we will respond accordingly,’ Clayton-Jonnson warned.

In addition to the funds funneled through the Silicon Valley fund, Cullors’ nonprofit – as well as several other associated charities, have received millions in direct donations from other notable Bay Area tech figures

In 2020, Twitter CEO Dorsey, 45, chipped in $1.5 million to Cullors’ nonprofit.  

That same year, Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and Patricia Ann Quillin, the wife of Netflix’s billionaire CEO, both offered generous donations to the tune of millions to Cullors’ PAC and other BLM-linked charities. 

Groups tied to Patrisse Cullors, the activist who co-founded Black Lives Matter, have received at least $7.5 million in donations from tech moguls tied to Twitter, Facebook and Netflix

Groups tied to Patrisse Cullors, the activist who co-founded Black Lives Matter, have received at least $7.5 million in donations from tech moguls tied to Twitter, Facebook and Netflix

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, who has an estimated net worth of $14 billion, chipped in $1.5 million to Cullors' nonprofit in 2020

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, who has an estimated net worth of $14 billion, chipped in $1.5 million to Cullors’ nonprofit in 2020

Moskovitz – who left Facebook in 2008 but retains a 2 percent stake in the company – his wife Cari Tuna gave to Cullors’ group the most generously, donating more than $5.5 million from 2017 to 2020, according to public records cited by the Post. 

His donations went to Dignity and Power Now, and Reform LA Jails, a California PAC Cullors co-founded to lobby for civilian oversight of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department. 

Dorsey, meanwhile, chipped in $1.5 million to Cullors-run groups that year as well, through his #startsmall philanthropy initiative.

The money went to Black Lives Matter and The Movement for Black Lives, a coalition of activist groups founded by Cullors. 

Quillin, the wife of Netflix billionaire Reed Hastings, donated $250,000 to Reform LA Jails in 2020. 

Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz his wife Cari Tuna have given the most generously, donating more than $5.5 million from 2017 to 2020

Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz his wife Cari Tuna have given the most generously, donating more than $5.5 million from 2017 to 2020

Quillin, the wife of Netflix billionaire Reed Hastings, donated $250,000 to Reform LA Jails in 2020.

Netflix billionaire Reed Hastings

Patricia Ann Quillin (left), the wife of Netflix billionaire Reed Hastings (right), donated $250,000 to Reform LA Jails in 2020

Cullors’ own finances are entwined to a degree with Reform LA Jails, which in 2019 paid $110,000 in consulting fees to a company controlled by her and her wife, Janaya Khan, according to the Post. 

There are no rules prohibiting officers of a California PAC from paying themselves or family members for consulting services. 

Cullors, who came under fire earlier this year after a report exposed a $6 million Los Angeles mansion purchased by the Black Lives brass that had been previously been kept secret, left her leadership post with BLM in May 2021 after reports regarding a slew of pricey real estate purchases made by Cullors, amounting to $3million, surfaced.

Last week, Indiana’s Attorney General Todd Rokita sued Black Lives Matter over its alleged misuse of donations after the group refused to reveal who controls its $60million central fund, to find exactly what the state residents’ donations had gone to. 

Members raised eyebrows by splashing the cash on the $6million mansion in Beverly Hills as well as a $3million home purchased by Cullors in Toronto. 

Last week, Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita filed a lawsuit against activist group Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation

Last week, Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita filed a lawsuit against activist group Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation

Nonprofit chaired by BLM co-founder pulled in .2m donations from Silicon Valley foundation

‘I filed a lawsuit against the Black Lives Matter organization to protect Hoosiers (any resident or person born in Indiana) from this house of cards,’ Rokita tweeted

Garza, Cullors and Tometi (left to right) co-founded the group, but Garza and Tometi left, leaving Cullors in charge as executive director

Garza, Cullors and Tometi (left to right) co-founded the group, but Garza and Tometi left, leaving Cullors in charge as executive director

‘I filed a lawsuit against the Black Lives Matter organization to protect Hoosiers (any resident or person born in Indiana) from this house of cards,’ Rokita tweeted.

‘BLM has concerning patterns of behavior & we’ll do what it takes to get to the bottom of it on behalf of generous Hoosiers who have donated to them.’ 

The suit is demanding the organization respond to investigative demands filed in February.

‘The Office of the Attorney General filed a Petition to Enforce a Civil Investigative Demand, which seeks an order requiring BLM to respond to a Civil Investigative Demand issued to the organization in February 2022,’ the attorney general’s office said in a release.

The AG’s suit is some of the most aggressive action taken against BLM after concerns over the group’s finances have swirled for years.

In February 2022, the group stopped online fundraising following a demand by the California attorney general to show where millions in donations received in 2020 went.

It said the ‘shutdown’ was short term while any ‘issues related to state fundraising compliance’ were addressed.

The group’s co-founder Cullors had stepped down as executive director of the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation in May 2021 amid scrutiny of her use of organization funds.

She demanded people ‘understand the enormous pressure and fear that comes with living under the constant threat of white supremacist terror and real threats on my life.’

The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation famously grew into one of the largest international movements against racial injustice in mid-2020 but has now come under intense scrutiny over its finances

The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation famously grew into one of the largest international movements against racial injustice in mid-2020 but has now come under intense scrutiny over its finances

Black Lives Matter secretly used $6 million in donations to buy luxurious 6,500-square foot mansion with seven bedrooms and parking for 20 cars in Southern California in 2020

Black Lives Matter secretly used $6 million in donations to buy luxurious 6,500-square foot mansion with seven bedrooms and parking for 20 cars in Southern California in 2020

The home features six bedrooms and a pool in the back. BLM claimed the home was bought to provide a safe house for 'black creativity' but had allegedly tried to hide the home's existence

The home features six bedrooms and a pool in the back. BLM claimed the home was bought to provide a safe house for ‘black creativity’ but had allegedly tried to hide the home’s existence 

After the purchase of a multi-million dollar mansion was fully exposed earlier this month in an article by New York Magazine, Cullors fired back in a lengthy Instagram post of her own, denouncing saying it was both a ‘racist and sexist attack’ on the organization.

The property was bought for almost $6million in cash in October 2020 with funds that had been donated to BLMGNF (Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation), the magazine reported.

‘That fact that a reputable publication would allow a reporter, with a proven and very public bias against me and other Black leaders, to write a piece filled with misinformation, innuendo and incendiary opinions, is disheartening and unacceptable,’ she stated.

Cullors called the report ‘a despicable abuse of a platform that’s intended to provide truthful information to the public.’

BLM attempted to justify the purchase of the mansion by saying it was made to encourage ‘Black creativity’ with the property ‘a space for Black folks to share their gifts with the world and hone their crafts as we see it.’

Dyane Pascall, president of the Conscious Capital Investment Enterprise real estate company and a former employ of Cullors, bought the LA property from televangelists Shawn and Cherie Bolz in 2016, according to property records.

The purchase came days after BLMGNF received an injection of $66.5 million in donations that had flooded in from around the globe after the murder of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis policeman.

The organization allegedly hoped to keep the house’s existence a secret – despite three of its former leaders reportedly filming a series of videos dining and drinking champagne outside the estate last spring, New York Magazine reported.

Documents and internal communications reportedly reveal the luxury property was handled in ways that ‘blur boundaries’ between charitable use and those that would benefit some of the organization’s leaders – including Cullors, who shared video in June of her enjoying a ritzy brunch outside the estate with fellow officials Alicia Garza and Melina Abdullah, who have both since left the organization.



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