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Emmy Rossum got BLISTERS from 3LB fake breasts she wore to play billboard queen Angelyne


Emmy Rossum has revealed that she developed blisters from the ‘heavy’ fake breasts she had to wear while filming her new Peacock miniseries ‘Angelyne.’ 

The actress, 35, opened up about physically transforming into the buxom Los Angeles billboard queen in a profile for The Hollywood Reporter, explaining she spent about four to five hours in makeup daily. 

‘The physicality of the character was challenging. The body is heavy, yet it has to feel light and effervescent,’ she told the magazine of emulating the pop-culture icon. 

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Emmy Rossum, 35, opened up about transforming into Los Angeles billboard queen Angelyne for her upcoming Peacock miniseries in a profile for The Hollywood Reporter

Emmy Rossum, 35, opened up about transforming into Los Angeles billboard queen Angelyne for her upcoming Peacock miniseries in a profile for The Hollywood Reporter 

The real-life Angelyne (pictured) grew a cult following after giant billboards bearing her likeness appeared around Hollywood in the 1980s

The real-life Angelyne (pictured) grew a cult following after giant billboards bearing her likeness appeared around Hollywood in the 1980s

To achieve Angelyne's famous bust (pictured), Rossum had a 3-pound breastplate glued to her torso that caused her blisters during filming

To achieve Angelyne's famous bust, Rossum had a 3-pound breastplate glued to her torso that caused her blisters during filming (pictured)

To achieve Angelyne’s famous bust (left), Rossum had a 3-pound breastplate glued to her torso that caused her blisters during filming (right)

A 3-pound breastplate was glued to her torso to achieve Angelyne’s famous bust, causing irritation to her skin. 

She also donned two pairs of contact lenses and heavy eye makeup that led to tear duct issues. A platinum blonde wig and bleached brows completed the look. 

‘I found it to be completely liberating to look in the mirror and not see myself at all,’ she said. ‘At first, it’s unnerving. But feeling lost gives way to this real liberation — from myself and the hang-ups that can impede a performance.’ 

Rossum got through the physical discomfort by focusing on ‘how lucky’ she felt to be playing the mysterious Angelyne.    

Rossum also suffered tear duct issues from wearing two pairs of contact lenses and heavy makeup to transform into the pop icon (pictured)

Rossum (pictured) also suffered tear duct issues from wearing two pairs of contact lenses and heavy makeup to transform into the pop icon

Rossum (right) also suffered tear duct issues from wearing two pairs of contact lenses and heavy makeup to transform into the pop icon (left) 

A platinum blonde wig and bleached brows completed Rossum's look in the series (pictured)

A platinum blonde wig and bleached brows completed Rossum’s look in the series (pictured)

‘This opportunity is really every actor’s dream,’ she said. ‘You raise your hand and you say, “Hey, I’d like to play this, and this is how I envision the story.”‘

Rossum and her husband, ‘Mr. Robot’ creator Sam Esmail, both executive produced the five-episode limited series about Angelyne.

Esmail, who shares a one-year-old daughter with his wife, admitted to finding her transformation to be unnerving at times. 

‘When I say that there are times where I did not recognize her because she was lost in this person, I really mean it,’ he told The Hollywood Reporter. ‘This is my wife I’m talking about. It’s kind of eerie.’ 

Emmy Rossum got BLISTERS from 3LB fake breasts she wore to play billboard queen Angelyne

‘The physicality of the character was challenging. The body is heavy, yet it has to feel light and effervescent,’ Rossum told The Hollywood Reporter of emulating Angelyne

With dark curly hair and eyes, the actress looks nothing like the buxom blonde in real life

With dark curly hair and eyes, the actress looks nothing like the buxom blonde in real life 

Angelyne, now 71, (pictured in 1997) granted the series the rights to her life, trademarks, art, and music catalog

Angelyne, now 71, (pictured in 1997) granted the series the rights to her life, trademarks, art, and music catalog

Angelyne, who was born Ronia Tamar Goldberg, grew a cult following after giant billboards bearing her likeness inexplicably appeared around Hollywood in the 1980s.

Rossum recalled seeing one of Angelyne’s billboards in Los Angeles when she was starting out as a child actress. 

‘In retrospect, it’s a very curated image, but it had a lot of impact on me,’ she said. ‘I remember seeing a woman who was totally empowered in her body, in her sexuality, in her womanhood in a way that I certainly was not at 13 — somebody that had captured the city’s attention, seemingly magically.’

‘Angelyne’ is based on a 2017 exposé by The Hollywood Reporter that revealed Angelyne’s true identity as the daughter of Polish parents who fled the Nazis’ concentration camps to start a new life in Los Angeles. 

Rossum dazzled in a black strapless gown with jeweled embellishments on the pink carpet at the premiere of 'Angelyne' in Los Angeles on Wednesday night

Rossum dazzled in a black strapless gown with jeweled embellishments on the pink carpet at the premiere of ‘Angelyne’ in Los Angeles on Wednesday night 

Rossum and her husband, 'Mr. Robot' creator Sam Esmail (pictured in 2019), both executive produced the five-episode limited series, and he admitted his wife's transformation was 'eerie'

Rossum and her husband, ‘Mr. Robot’ creator Sam Esmail (pictured in 2019), both executive produced the five-episode limited series, and he admitted his wife’s transformation was ‘eerie’ 

The upcoming miniseries premiered in Los Angeles on Wednesday night, and Rossum dazzled in a black strapless gown with jeweled embellishments on the pink carpet. 

She told Variety that the real-life Angelyne, now 71, granted the series the rights to her life, trademarks, art, and music catalog, which airs on May 19. 

‘It was so important to me that she be involved in this and that we were able to faithfully recreate her iconic billboards,’ Rossum said. 

‘And it was really, really important to me that she be paid for her contribution, not just to the show, but to pop culture over the last 50 years.’



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